Entropy

A Species Set on Endless Growth is Unsustainable

931 notes

orphanblack:

Meet Cosima Herter, Orphan Black science consultant and the real inspiration for clone Cosima!

"Real Cosima helps us with the science and the larger picture of where the science fits into society…" - Graeme Manson (x)

For an extended Q&A with Cosima Herter, click HERE.

(via youtrickyminx)

30 notes

prolethean:

as clones, they all have the same biological markers and propensity for specific psychological traits, right, they just need the right environmental trigger. any of them could have been beth. and i guess what worries me most about alison for season 2 is that she’s certainly had some triggers, and she is certainly knee-deep in a spiral. 

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1,575 notes

sufferingsappho:

"Um, you can’t be a woman because you don’t have breasts"
There are cis women who don’t have breasts
“You’re not a woman if you don’t give birth”
There are cis women who can’t or don’t give birth
“You only have that body because of hormones”
There are cis women who take hormones
“Because of surgery!”
There are cis women who have cosmetic surgery
There are cis women who have body hair, who have facial hair, who don’t menstruate, who are taller, who are more muscular, who play sports, who have deep voices, who don’t like wearing dresses, who only wear dresses, who suck at doing their own hair and makeup, who play video games, who watch violent movies, who take up space and who refuse to silence themselves for the sakes of others.
When you police trans women, you police all women.

(via primadonna-grrrl)

4,005 notes

postwhitesociety:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

yeslikethefuckinmermaid:

newsweek:

WAKE FOREST, N.C. — Janette Simon has four chicken legs and five kids to feed. Her freezer is bare.
And her latest trip to the food pantry yielded little else for dinner this night: a bag of day-old croissants, a box of Corn Flakes, and some canned goods.
She slathers barbecue sauce on the chicken, slides the pan in the oven, and begins her nightly ritual of distracting her five children from hunger. The 44-year-old single mother often skips dinner herself. She hides Ramen noodle packets in her closet to ration food.
She tells her two youngest kids to play outside “so they ain’t thinking about eating.” “That’s what I have to worry about,” she says. “I gotta look at these kids with their sad faces and no food.”
On the 13th of every month, she has counted on seeing a $600 payment on her food-stamp debit card. But now, that payment is a month late. Simon and thousands like her in North Carolina had enough to worry about before a computer glitch began to fray this basic part of the social safety net. Last July, government computers across the state repeatedly crashed, preventing caseworkers from processing food stamp applications and recertifications for weeks.
Eight months later, North Carolina officials are still scrambling to clear the resulting backlog.
How A Government Computer Glitch Forced Thousands Of Families To Go Hungry

so messed up.


The glitches often take months or even years to fix because technology for poor people is not considered a high priority, according to David Super, aGeorgetown University law professor who studies government technology projects.
After hiring dozens of engineers and programmers from tech industry giants like Google and Oracle, the federal government largely fixed problems with the health-care website in about two months. But many states have taken much longer to fix computer errors with welfare programs. Colorado’s troubled system for food stamps and Medicaid has been plagued by glitches and delays for the past decade.
“Almost everyone using the Obamacare website was not poor,” Super said in an interview. “In contrast, technology that serves the poor has gotten less and less attention and has been working badly for many, many years.”
Can we talk about this part of the article? lets talk about this part of the article. 


Let’s.

postwhitesociety:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

yeslikethefuckinmermaid:

newsweek:

WAKE FOREST, N.C. — Janette Simon has four chicken legs and five kids to feed. Her freezer is bare.

And her latest trip to the food pantry yielded little else for dinner this night: a bag of day-old croissants, a box of Corn Flakes, and some canned goods.

She slathers barbecue sauce on the chicken, slides the pan in the oven, and begins her nightly ritual of distracting her five children from hunger. The 44-year-old single mother often skips dinner herself. She hides Ramen noodle packets in her closet to ration food.

She tells her two youngest kids to play outside “so they ain’t thinking about eating.” “That’s what I have to worry about,” she says. “I gotta look at these kids with their sad faces and no food.”

On the 13th of every month, she has counted on seeing a $600 payment on her food-stamp debit card. But now, that payment is a month late. Simon and thousands like her in North Carolina had enough to worry about before a computer glitch began to fray this basic part of the social safety net. Last July, government computers across the state repeatedly crashed, preventing caseworkers from processing food stamp applications and recertifications for weeks.

Eight months later, North Carolina officials are still scrambling to clear the resulting backlog.

How A Government Computer Glitch Forced Thousands Of Families To Go Hungry

so messed up.

The glitches often take months or even years to fix because technology for poor people is not considered a high priority, according to David Super, aGeorgetown University law professor who studies government technology projects.

After hiring dozens of engineers and programmers from tech industry giants like Google and Oracle, the federal government largely fixed problems with the health-care website in about two months. But many states have taken much longer to fix computer errors with welfare programs. Colorado’s troubled system for food stamps and Medicaid has been plagued by glitches and delays for the past decade.

“Almost everyone using the Obamacare website was not poor,” Super said in an interview. “In contrast, technology that serves the poor has gotten less and less attention and has been working badly for many, many years.”

Can we talk about this part of the article? lets talk about this part of the article. 

Let’s.

(via youtrickyminx)